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Traveler Cards

I am a widow living only a few miles from Williamsburg. I manage a small farm, have a large family and one slave. Although I own corn and tobacco fields, I do not make enough money from these crops to take care of my family. Thus, twice each week, I take milk, fresh churned butter, eggs, and fruits and vegetables from my garden to the market square in Williamsburg to sell. I leave early in the morning while it is still dark. It takes me an hour to reach Williamsburg. At the end of the day, I return home with the produce I didn't sell. I am a slave from Carter's Grove Plantation. I am hired to work in the gardens at the Governor's Palace because I am highly regarded for my knowledge of gardening. My wife and children live on the plantation. On Saturday night, I travel eight miles to the plantation so that I can spend Sunday with my family. There I cultivate a garden plot to supply vegetables so that my wife and children will have more food than just the rations given to them. I also find time to rest and enjoy myself with kinfolk, neighbors and friends. On Sunday evening, I travel back to the Governor's Palace. I am a storeowner in Williamsburg. Yesterday, I traveled to the port of Yorktown where an imported shipment of goods for my store arrived from England. The shipment was removed from the ship and I'm taking these goods to my store. My customers will like the new earthenware, glass, skillets, silverware, soap, coffee, tools, and fabrics that they can purchase for ready money. I will have the Virginia Gazette print advertisements listing these imported goods. While I am away from my store, my indentured servant will make room on the shelves for these goods. I am an elected member of the House of Burgesses. I travel to Williamsburg twice a year during the Publick Times. I will attend the General Assembly with other elected burgesses at the Capitol to vote on colonial laws for the colony of Virginia. At times we engage in rather heated debates. I will stay at the Raleigh Tavern where I will find good food, drink and lodging for myself and my personal slave. When business is finished for the day, some of my fellow burgesses, who are also staying at the Raleigh, will join me in sharing stories late into the night. In a few weeks I will return home to my family.

 



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