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Objectives

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAM:

Elementary school sessions focus on the colonial and the early nation period, exploring content from 1607 through the end of the Revolutionary War. During the week, teachers will

  • Identify and analyze significant seventeenth- and eighteenth-century economic, political, and social events that led to American independence from Great Britain.
  • Explore how Native American, European, and African interactions shaped and defined the American character.
  • Use primary sources to explore daily life in colonial Virginia.
  • Investigate the lifestyles of various social levels in eighteenth-century America, including the gentry, middling sort, tradespeople, merchants, soldiers, women, and slaves.
  • Learn and review how to develop students’ abilities to use higher level critical thinking skills through the use of primary sources and technological resources.

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM:

Middle school sessions focus on the emerging American identity from 1607 to 1865. During the week, teachers will:

  • Identify and analyze four pairs of seemingly contradictory values that created, shaped, and continue to influence the course of American history.
  • Examine our founding principles and how they are adapted and changed with each generation.
  • Evaluate how historical events have impacted Americans’ expectations of citizenship.
  • Apply strategies that encourage discussion, debate, and civil discourse in the classroom.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM:

High school sessions use a thematic approach to American history in which teachers explore content from 1607 to the Vietnam War and examine how issues in American history have been under constant debate. During the week, teachers will:

  • Identify and analyze the four pairs of seemingly contradictory values that created, shaped, and continue to influence the course of American history.
  • Investigate how founding ideas from each century have changed Americans’ expectations of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”
  • Explore religion and reform, technology, the rule of law, protest, and cultural diversity as continuing themes in American history.
  • Examine how history is created, understood, and taught by looking at a variety of historiographical trends.
  • Create a network through which they and Colonial Williamsburg staff can acquire and exchange information about historical trends and issues relevant in the classroom.

INSTITUTE IN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CONTENT LITERACY

The  Institute in American History and Content Literacy will focus on the colonial period, exploring content from 1750 until the end of the Revolutionary War. During the week, teachers will:

  • Investigate the daily lifestyles of various social levels in eighteenth-century America, including the gentry, middling sort, tradespeople, merchants, soldiers, women, and slaves.
  • Explore European and African interactions including folklore, ideas, and other cultural contributions that helped to shape and defined the American character.
  • Interpret primary sources to explore daily life in colonial Virginia including social/cultural, political, economic, scientific/technological, or religious.
  • Identify and analyze significant eighteenth-century economic, political, and social events that led to American independence from Great Britain.
  • Learn and review how to develop students' abilities to use higher level critical thinking skills through the use of primary sources and technological resources.
  • Practice and draft lessons focused on nonfiction reading and writing skills, note-taking, writing to learn, writing to teach others, and for public speaking and debate.
  • Draft, revise, edit, and publish demonstration texts aimed at supporting students’ informational writing skills.


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